SC gas prices fall nearly 7 cents over past week

Gas prices in South Carolina fell 6.7 cents last week bringing the state’s average price per...
Gas prices in South Carolina fell 6.7 cents last week bringing the state’s average price per gallon down to $3.26, according to GasBuddy’s weekly survey of the state’s gas stations.(Live 5/File)
Published: Oct. 24, 2022 at 6:36 AM EDT|Updated: Oct. 24, 2022 at 12:37 PM EDT
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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - Gas prices in South Carolina fell 6.7 cents last week bringing the state’s average price per gallon down to $3.26, according to GasBuddy’s weekly survey of the state’s gas stations.

The cheapest gas in the state was priced at $2.99 on Sunday while the most expensive was $3.99, a difference of $1.

Prices in the Palmetto State are 9.5 cents higher than a month ago and 12.7 cents higher than one year ago.

As of Monday morning, the cheapest gas in the Tri-County was at a station in Moncks Corner selling gas for $3.09 per gallon.

Click here to find the cheapest gas near your neighborhood.

Nationally, the average price per gallon fell 9.3 cents last week, averaging $3.77 per gallon as of Monday morning. The national average is up 10.2 cents per gallon from a month ago and stands 41.2 cents higher than one year ago, according to GasBuddy data compiled from more than 11 million weekly price reports covering over 150,000 gas stations across the country.

The national average price for diesel continued to rise, climbing four cents over the past week, bringing the national average to $5.30 per gallon.

“Average gas prices have declined for the second straight week with significant declines in the West and Great Lakes having an oversized effect on the drop in the national average,” Head of Petroleum Analysis at GasBuddy Patrick De Haan said. “With oil prices struggling a bit after reaching $93 after OPEC+’s decision to cut production, many regions could see falling gas prices again this week as demand continues to decline seasonally, especially if more data points to a significant economic slowdown. While gasoline prices have seen a large drop, diesel prices have been somewhat mixed, with prices heading higher in the Northeast as inventories drop to extremely tight levels ahead of the heating oil season. Motorists are reminded that the decline in gasoline prices is seasonal and should continue into the fall, and is unrelated to the coming election. Seasonality is king in driving prices, not the desires or hopes of politicians.”