Do the ‘Time Warp’ again — ‘Rocky Horror’ show will travel

The pandemic forced the annual tour to be held at drive-ins, but the new version is back to in-person gatherings
The pandemic forced the annual Rock Horror Picture Show tour to be held at drive-ins, but the...
The pandemic forced the annual Rock Horror Picture Show tour to be held at drive-ins, but the new version is back to in-person gatherings.(WILX)
Published: Sep. 29, 2022 at 10:34 PM EDT
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(AP) - Grab your toilet paper. Bring a flashlight. Don’t forget a newspaper — or your fishnets. A touring, interactive version of “The Rocky Horror Picture Show” is hitting the road to celebrate the cult film’s birthday with screenings, live shadow casts, the invitation to be inappropriate and one of its original stars— Barry Bostwick.

Released in 1975, the sci-fi, cross-dressing rock musical became a cult favorite and entered the pop culture lexicon for its many iconic and memorable scenes, including the song “The Time Warp” which has been covered by handfuls of artists and the often quoted phrase, “Dammit, Janet.” Other things yelled are less PG-13.

“It has endured because it was always organic,” said Bostwick. “The call-backs and throwing stuff was never introduced by the filmmakers or the studio. It was by fans, who added layer after layer and then that all got standardized.”

The story centers on the goody two-shoes Janet and Brad, a young couple with car trouble who stumble on an old castle filled with eccentric characters: cross-dressers, scientists and a maid, included. This leads to some interesting pairings and experimentations. The film made household names of Bostwick, who played Brad, Susan Sarandon as Janet and Tim Curry, the castle’s Dr. Frank-N-Furter.

Bostwick will be at each stop, meeting guests and introducing the film. He has had a very varied career since “Rocky Horror,” including roles on “Scrubs,” “Cougar Town” and “Spin City,” plus winning a Tony Award — but few projects have triggered as much sustained enthusiasm as playing Brad.

Scott Stander, who produces the show as part of his portfolio of concerts, variety shows and celebrity evenings, said part of the appeal of “Rocky Horror” has been its invitation to audiences to cut loose.

The pandemic forced the annual tour to be held at drive-ins, but the new version is back to in-person gatherings, something Stander feels we’ve missed.