80 dogs seized in joint animal cruelty investigation in York County

During the search, approximately 50 pitbulls and 30 beagles were found.
The South Carolina U-S Attorney's Office announced what could be the biggest dogfighting ring takedown in the Palmetto state's history.
Published: Sep. 25, 2022 at 3:23 PM EDT

YORK COUNTY, S.C. (WBTV) - The York County Sheriff’s Office seized more than 80 dogs on Sunday morning in an operation to combat illegal breeding and fighting dogs.

The operation was coordinated by the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the State Law Enforcement Division (SLED).

This investigation is part of a larger bust involving more than 300 dogs, according to the U.S. Attorney of South Carolina.

York County deputies assisted with executing a search warrant at adjoining properties off Wildcat Creek Road in Rock Hill. Kelvin Foster—was arrested when more than 80 dogs were found on his property. 30 of these dogs are now at the animal shelter where it is an all-hands-on-deck situation.

During the search, approximately 50 pit bulls and 30 beagles were found. The dogs were taken by animal control and a contract company that specializes in rescuing fighting dogs. During the search, three people were arrested on other charges in reference to stolen property and various narcotics charges.

“Animal cruelty on any level is disturbing,” said Sheriff Kevin Tolson. “We’re grateful to work with all levels of law enforcement to combat the evilness of animal fighting. I urge the courts to help render justice from this point moving forward.”

The York County Sheriff’s Office seized more than 80 dogs on Sunday morning in an operation to...
The York County Sheriff’s Office seized more than 80 dogs on Sunday morning in an operation to combat illegal breeding and fighting dogs.(York County Sheriff's Office)

Bobbi Comer is the York County Shelter’s director. She closed shop to make room.

”When we get in a case that comes from a possible cruelty situation or something of that sort, those animals are in most need of our care and services,” says Comer.

No two cases are alike. Comer says that care looks different depending on what kind of case these animals come from.

”It is a double edged sword. Because part of it is the staff feels very grateful to be part of something where we’re making such a difference in animals lives. But the second part of it is it just consumes all the resources,” she says.

Those resources-food, basic care items and blankets can always help. Comer says they can’t get too much supplies. So they are leaning on people in the community. People like Rita and George Kady donated food and more.

”I just would say to anybody out there if this touches your heart please help with these animals,” she says.

The York County Shelter’s Facebook page with the information on where to find what they need is here.

This is an ongoing investigation. More information about the operation will come from the USDA and SLED.

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