CMS Board of Education starts monthly progress monitoring session at meetings

CMS leaders discussed college and career readiness rates for Black and Hispanic third graders
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools leaders are now doing progress monitoring sessions at Board meetings at least once a month.
Published: Sep. 13, 2022 at 11:20 PM EDT

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - The work to improve student performance isn’t limited to the classroom.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools leaders are now doing progress monitoring sessions at Board meetings at least once a month.

Tuesday’s Board meeting was the first meeting since the 2022-2023 school year started and the first meeting that implemented the monthly progress monitoring updates.

“From this point forward, you will see us at just about every board meeting having a progress monitoring report. A report where we check in on the progress [that] the district is making towards the four goals that we’ve set for the district,” said Board Chair Elyse Dashew.

Nearly two weeks ago, CMS released the 2021-2022 state testing data from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Data showed improvements from the previous school year, but school leaders say there is still more work to be done.

Previous Coverage: NCDPI releases academic report following third year of pandemic impact, CMS showing signs of recovery

Board members dedicated time to answering the Interim Superintendent, Hugh Hattabaugh, strategic questions about the data presented on college and career readiness rates on reading scores for Black and Hispanic third graders.

According to the report, the district wants to improve college and career readiness rates for those students from nearly 16 percent in October 2021 to 36 percent by the end of the 2022-2023 school year and 50 percent by October 2024.

Interim Superintendent Hugh Hattabaugh says they’re placing more certified teachers in second and third-grade classrooms and adding more resources in low-performing schools.

CMS currently has 50 low-performing schools which received a “D” or “F” grade from the state.

“From looking at what’s going on with the additional support that we have in many of our elementary [schools] with the MTSS facilitators, interventionists, coaches, I think we have a great opportunity to get to 36 percent,” Hattabaugh said.

The Board will discuss Math I college and career readiness levels for high schoolers at the board meeting later this month.