Matthews Alive wraps up Monday, helping businesses all weekend

Hundreds of people came to the event, with many observing just how different the two years made.
People have been really excited to be back out here too especially because there is enough food to put anyone in a coma.
Published: Sep. 5, 2022 at 5:19 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - An exciting weekend is coming to an end in the town of Matthews.

After a couple of years of cancellations because of the pandemic, Matthews Alive came back and in a big way. The festival brings thousands of people to downtown Matthews every year. While there is more food and family fun for everyone, there is an even better reason to get out there.

For anybody who does not know, Matthews Alive is a four-day festival always over the Labor Day weekend. The event supports local non-profits. The money raised at Matthews Alive goes right to those non-profits so they can keep helping you. To date, the event has donated 1.9 million dollars to those organizations!

People have been really excited to be back out here too especially because there is enough food to put anyone in a coma. People were happy the family fun returned to Matthews at the Matthews Alive event! And so did the crowd.

Related: Historian talks town history as thousands gather for Matthews Alive festival

“The festival just means so much to everybody. Just being together and enjoying fun and laughter and the music. Great food. Everything,” says one woman who attended with her grandson.

Hundreds of people came to the event, with many observing just how different the two years made.

”It’s weird because I’ve seen nobody with their mask on,” says one attendee.

“So happy it’s back again. It’s nice to be around everyone and everyone is having a nice time today,” says another.

That two years were not just making a difference with the pandemic protocols.

”I don’t want to cry but it was very strenuous,” says Peter Hankenjohann, owner of Kleine Beine—a local honey shop.

His business, like many others, suffered without festivals.

”At the end of the year if you can’t sell the honey, it doesn’t go away, it doesn’t go bad but it’s also not paying the bull sitting in the building,” he says.

Hankenjohann says his business doesn’t have an online presence, so festivals are their only way of making money. So crowds are encouraging.

”It feels great because I want to say it’s back to what it was pre-COVID,” he explains.

With the festivals rolling in, Hankenjohann says he’s booked almost every weekend for the rest of the year.

”After two years of a break, I said let’s start booking and then we kept on booking,” he says.

So he is making up for lost time, something he is grateful for.

”It’s hot. I’m exhausted. But it’s…I don’t want to go back and sit around at home,” he shares.