Charlotte City Council votes to pass Unified Development Ordinance

It would allow developers to build duplexes or larger developments in areas currently zoned for single-family housing.
Published: Aug. 22, 2022 at 5:48 AM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - The Charlotte City Council voted 6-4 to pass the Unified Development Ordinance during Monday night’s meeting.

It’s the zoning plan and set of rules to regulate future construction and development in Charlotte. Neighborhoods full of single-family homes would change if the UDO passes.

Related: Charlotte planners adopt new Unified Development Ordinance draft

It would allow developers to build duplexes or larger developments in areas currently zoned for single-family housing.

The Charlotte City Council voted 6-4 to pass the Unified Development Ordinance during Monday night’s meeting.

“Today where there’s one family living on one lot, could give the potential to have two to three to four times the families to be able to live in that same square footage,” Eric Zaverl of Sustain Charlotte said.

While supporters say this part of the UDO would provide affordable housing and modernize otherwise outdated regulations, opponents worry this will alter Charlotte’s neighborhoods and accelerate gentrification.

“When you allow developers to up zone by a factor of two, three and even four times, without them ever having to meet the community or the community’s elected representatives...it’s the developers and investors who win and not the community,” Charlotte City Council’s Matt Newton said.

Others are in favor, say it’s a compromise.

“The overall document makes significant improvements to where we are currently, and that’s why I support the UDO,” Ajjmera Dimple said.

Victoria Watlington, even pushed to delay that part of the UDO.

“It would behoove us to do our due diligence,” she said.

Back in July several people told the city council what they thought about the proposal.

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“One day they’re going to wake up and their neighbors’ homes are going to be demolished and added duplexes and triplexes, which is not fair to those that have invested years of their time and money to have a place of their own,” UDO opponent Karen Henning previously said.

“The main reason we’re doing what we’re doing is because we have to have a community where we can continue to give housing options so that everybody can afford to live in Charlotte,” supporter Sam Spencer said back in July.

Opponents have tried to strip that language from the UDO, something that could happen during Monday’s city council meeting.

For those who live in a neighborhood with an HOA, those rules will apply, regardless of what the city council does.

The UDO would apply to residents who don’t have an HOA.

One council member, Renee Johnson, is home with COVID and was not able to vote for or against the UDO