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Swastikas drawn in residence hall at Queens University of Charlotte; Jewish community on-campus saddened

“It’s devastating when you have an act of hate aimed at you...”
The symbols were drawn around campus late last week and over the weekend in both open areas and residence halls.
Published: Apr. 25, 2022 at 5:33 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - The Jewish community at Queens University of Charlotte is devastated after swastikas were found in an on-campus building last week.

“We want to say clearly and unequivocally that hate is not welcome here,” said Rabbi Judy Schindler, the Sklut Professor of Jewish Studies and Campus Rabbi at Queens University of Charlotte.

The school denounced the hateful symbol in a release on Monday to the media and students.

The administration said this crime does not represent the values of Queens University of Charlotte, and they’re stepping up security as campus police investigate the incident.

Lia Federbusch, an international student at Queens University of Charlotte and from Israel said, “this is a crime of hate.”

It’s a crime the university said took place over several days last week and into the weekend.

The Jewish community at Queens University of Charlotte is devastated after swastikas were found in an on-campus building last week.

The incident is having a deep impact on the Jewish community on campus.

“Especially as I am a third generation of a Holocaust survivor, but I think it should affect everyone, it affects me the same,” Federbusch said.

Rabbi Schindler said, “the act of one individual or perhaps two individuals who scrawled these hateful symbols can be so devastating and shatter the sense of security for so many students.”

The swastikas were drawn in residence halls on-campus. One of the symbols is in the common space while the other two are drawn on the doors of student homes.

“It’s devastating when you have an act of hate aimed at you, a part of your identity and I pray it will not happen to anyone else,” said Rabbi Schindler.

The Rabbi is hopeful people of all faiths and ethnicities will come together to say no to hate.

Gabriele Erandi, an international student at University of Charlotte said, “we are kind of family you know, so if something like this affects one student, it affects all and we all need to work together to overcome this situation.”

Federbusch added, “we are really strong and we’re going to fight it, and there’s no place of hate on this campus.”

In response to the hateful symbols drawn on campus, the university is hosting a forum in the Trexler Courtyard called “Queens Stand for Unity.”

The Rabbi is hopeful tonight will help students feel valued, loved, appreciated, and included after the past few days of hateful symbols on campus.

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