Advertisement

Habitat for Humanity weathers pandemic, supply chain issues to help Charlotte residents get affordable housing

That need for affordable housing went up during the pandemic when organizers with Habitat said they were forced to limit volunteers.
According to the National Association of Home Builders, wholesale prices for home building equipment increased by 22% by 2021.
Published: Apr. 21, 2022 at 10:37 AM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Finding affordable housing is still a challenge in Charlotte.

However, local organizations like Habitat for Humanity are reminding people help is out there, even though they’ve run into their own challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

That need for affordable housing went up during the pandemic when organizers with Habitat said they were forced to limit volunteers.

Now that many projects that had to be delayed are starting back up again, it’s coming at a time when supply chain issues are now compounding the problem, along with higher prices for land and building equipment.

According to the National Association of Home Builders, wholesale prices for home building equipment increased by 22% by 2021.

Organizers with Charlotte Region Habitat said the $13 million out of the total $18.5 million that American author and philanthropist MacKenzie Scott donated to local Habitat for Humanity affiliates back in March is helping tremendously.

Related: MacKenzie Scott donates nearly $20M to Catawba Valley, York Co. and Charlotte-area Habitat for Humanity

Still, building new homes is not the only thing Habitat for Humanity does. Members also do even more “critical home repair” to help fix issues in existing houses, which is also free to homeowners due to grants or donations.

The organization has seen more of a shift to these repairs in recent years.

Back in 2019, Habitat closed on 48 homes and performed 79 critical home repair (CHR) projects.

In 2020, home building went down to 43, but CHR shot up to 80.

Last year, home building was 32 while CHR was 129.

Charlotte Region Habitat’s vice president of construction said they’re also starting to shift focus more to building townhomes that could help multiple families instead of single-family lots they typically used.

Chevon Faulkner is just one person who has gotten help from Habitat

Faulkner, who drives a shuttle bus for Charlotte Douglas International Airport, started with Habitat for Humanity back in June 2020, at a time when air travel was down significantly and she was hit with hard times due to the pandemic.

Now, Faulkner says she, her son and their dog Brown are thankful because their home is finally here.

“The cost of living has skyrocketed. I imported from New Jersey 20 years ago now and to have a steady income and still live in a shack, so to speak, and then the price is going up and up. I know this is a blessing. This is my forever home, and it’s wealth. A home is wealth,” Faulkner said.

Go to the Charlotte Region Habitat’s website for information on how to receive assistance.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.