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Police issue warning after 2-year-old ingests THC-laced gummies

Deputies with the Oconee Sheriff’s Office, near the South Carolina-Georgia border, said a...
Deputies with the Oconee Sheriff’s Office, near the South Carolina-Georgia border, said a 2-year-old child had to be recently treated at a local hospital after consuming such a gummy (WHNS)(Special Operations Bureau)
Published: Mar. 29, 2022 at 10:51 PM EDT
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OCONEE COUNTY, S.C. (WHNS/Gray News) - After several incidents, authorities in South Carolina are warning parents about the dangers of children ingesting THC-laced gummies.

WHNS reports deputies with the Oconee Sheriff’s Office, near the South Carolina-Georgia border, said a 2-year-old child had to be recently treated at a local hospital after consuming such a gummy.

And in separate incidents, a 14-year-old received medical treatment, and a 15-year-old was reported as being paranoid and talkative after eating a THC-laced gummy, according to the sheriff’s office.

Narcotics agents in Oconee County said minors could legally purchase these gummies if they contain less than 0.30 percent THC, with several available online.

But the sheriff’s office said the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division is finding that more than half of the products tested contain a level of THC above the legal limit.

“This, unfortunately, is an unintended consequence of our state legalizing hemp,” said Oconee County Sheriff Mike Crenshaw. “There are no current regulations concerning these products. Law enforcement has to pay hundreds of dollars per test to have a private lab test the THC level in these products due to the state crime lab not being able to test THC levels in these types of products. Due to the lack of regulations, one gummy can have a much higher percentage of THC than another one in the same bag.”

The sheriff said his narcotics agents also see the varying THC levels in vapes sold as hemp.

“We wanted to send this alert out to parents and guardians so they can be aware of these products to make sure that their children do not have them in their possession,” Crenshaw said. “I also ask business owners to consider removing these products from their stores that can cause children to become ill.”

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