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Study: N.C. can do more to prevent traffic crashes

They gave both North Carolina and South Carolina a grade of “yellow,” which is middle of the road.
The group Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety analyze crash numbers and laws from each state and push for tougher laws aimed at protecting lives.
Published: Jan. 19, 2022 at 7:49 AM EST
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - The Carolinas could do a better job preventing crashes, especially those that end with someone’s death.

That’s the conclusion from an advocacy group aimed at stopping highway deaths.

The group Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety analyze crash numbers and laws from each state and push for tougher laws aimed at protecting lives.

They gave both North Carolina and South Carolina a grade of “yellow,” which is middle of the road. New York and Rhode island were rated highest, while Missouri and Wyoming were at the bottom.

The group Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety analyze crash numbers and laws from each state...
The group Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety analyze crash numbers and laws from each state and push for tougher laws aimed at protecting lives.

The group found in North Carolina in 2019 there were nearly 1,400 deadly crashes. When adding up the medical costs, property damage and loss of productivity, that comes to an impact of more than $9.5 billion.

Members of the group want to see lawmakers pass laws requiring rear-facing booster seats for children up through age 2. They also want the minimum age for a learner’s permit to be 16, and 18 for an unrestricted license.

The group would also like to see the state adopt a law that would allow police to stop a car when a backseat passenger isn’t belted. Currently, that’s not a primary reason for a stop.

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