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Tropical Storm Odette forms offshore the Mid-Atlantic coast

Odette will continue to create a rough surf and higher risk for rip currents for beaches along the Carolina coast.
Published: Sep. 14, 2021 at 6:43 PM EDT|Updated: Sep. 17, 2021 at 8:08 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Tropical Storm Odette developed off the Mid-Atlantic coast Friday afternoon, and is expected to move northeast and further away from the Carolinas this weekend.

For the most up-to-the-minute updates, download the WBTV Weather App.

Odette will continue to create a rough surf and higher risk for rip currents for beaches along the Carolina coast.

Another weather disturbance moving across the central Atlantic Ocean, may also become a tropical depression or tropical storm this weekend. Weather forecast data suggests this system could approach the Bahamas and be closer to the U.S. East Coast by late next week.

There is still a lot of uncertainty with the exact path this system will take, yet we will need to closely monitor the tropics for updates on the path and strength of this system.

The next tropical name of the season will be “Peter”, if needed.

Meteorologist Jason Myers

Thursday at 6 p.m.

We are closely monitoring a weather disturbance off the Carolina coast that could become more tropical in the next 24 to 48 hours. This system is expected to stay offshore, yet it will create a rough surf and higher risk for rip currents for Carolina and Mid-Atlantic beaches Friday into the weekend.

For the most up-to-the-minute updates, download the WBTV Weather App.

Another weather disturbance churning across the central Atlantic Ocean, may also become a tropical depression or storm in the next 24 to 48 hours. Weather forecast data suggests this system could approach the Bahamas and be closer to the U.S. East Coast by late next week. There is still a lot of uncertainty with the exact path this system will take, yet we will need to closely monitor the tropics for updates on the path and strength of this system.

The next two tropical names of the season will be “Odette” and “Peter” if needed.

We are still in the average peak of the Atlantic hurricane season, and the season runs through November 30th.

Meteorologist Jason Myers

Wednesday at 6 p.m.

The remnants of Nicholas continue to move across the Deep South. It is bringing plenty of rain to Mississippi, Alabama and Georgia already.

The National Hurricane Center has stopped issuing updates since it has dropped below the criteria for a tropical system. Still, it is a big rainmaker.

Most of the heavy rain will remain to our south but a few showers are possible for the Carolinas.

For the most up-to-the-minute updates, download the WBTV Weather App.

There’s another system off the east coast. It has a 70% chance of formation over the next 48 hours. Fortunately, all the models are keeping the system away from our coast. While the Carolina beaches aren’t bracing for impact, once again, dangerous rip currents are likely.

The last disturbance is just off the coast of Africa. It has a 90% chance of formation. For now, the longest-range models seem to keep this one off the east coast toward the end of the month. We will continue to monitor it every single day.

Stay tuned to WBTV for the very latest.

Meteorologist Leigh Brock

Tuesday at 6 p.m.

Nicholas currently has winds of 40mph but is expected to weaken to a depression overnight. Tropical Storm Nicholas is in no hurry to get anywhere.

The storm is currently moving ENE at 6mph. Between now and Thursday evening, the storm will only make it about 160 miles, moving from eastern Texas into south central Louisiana.

Because it is moving so slowly, it will put down a lot of rain in a relatively small area. Even worse, all that rain will fall across the same places which were so hard hit by Ida not that long ago.

As for the Carolinas, we NEED rain. Things are getting drier and drier by the day. At best, we have about a 30% chance each afternoon for the rest of the week. The long-term models are split on how they see things playing out. One is bringing in a chance for rain due to the remnants of Nicholas by Saturday. The other is not predicting any rain for us at all.

There are also two other systems to keep an eye on. One has just moved off the coast of Africa. It has a 90% chance of formation over the next five days. It would be a while before this one could impact the US.

There is another disturbance a few hundred miles north of the Bahamas. This one has a 60% chance of formation over the next five days. Most models are keeping this storm off the Carolina coast. Still, at very least, it will cause choppy seas and strong rip currents along our beaches.

We will continue to monitor all of these through the week.

Meteorologist Leigh Brock

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