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‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares message after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition

Published: Jul. 11, 2021 at 11:01 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Alyssa Simons was like any other 15-year-old.

She loved to skateboard, her mom, Shernett Reevey says.

“She was a healthy child, never...no problems,” Reevey added.

The problems started after she and her family tested positive for COVID-19 in March.

Reevey said doctors diagnosed Alyssa with Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children -- a condition where body parts become inflamed.

‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of...
‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition(Family photo)

Alyssa, a student at North Mecklenburg High School, died last month of complications from the rare condition.

Weeks went by after she contracted COVID-19 before Alyssa started having issues.

She complained about stomach and back pains.

She made a doctor’s appointment.

“She didn’t make it to the appointment because I had to call 911. The four, five days I was gone, she lost like 40 pounds,” Reevey said.

‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of...
‘I hope my daughter’s story can save a life’: Charlotte mom shares story after teen dies of rare COVID-related condition(Family photo)

For the next 10 days, Alyssa was in the hospital.

Reevey says doctors diagnosed Alyssa with MIS-C.

It’s also a condition, the CDC says, is associated with COVID-19 in kids.

“It’s something serious that a lot of people need to be aware of. Sometimes you may overlook it. A lot of people may have had COVID and you never knew,” Reevey said.

Alyssa came home.

However, days went by and it seemed as if she’d gotten better.

“I started noticing she didn’t want to come down the stairs no more. She started complaining, she was feeling week,” Reevey said.

An appointment was made to see a specialist but the teen never made it.

She died on June 28.

“She wasn’t herself that night,” Reevey said. “Until 3 o’clock in the morning, I was in and out of the room. I stayed 30 minutes with her. My kids were going to summer camp, I was like, ‘I got to get some rest real quick so I can wake up a 6 o’clock to get your brothers and sisters to summer camp.

“She gave me a hug and I went to go lay down and I came in the morning and she was already passed away.”

Now, she’s sharing her story in hopes of helping someone else.

“Look at your kids and the symptoms they have. COVID is real and there is other stuff that comes after COVID -- which is MIS-C that affects kids 2-15 and it’s not being talked about,” Reevey said. “To get vaccinated, I hope my daughter’s story can save a life. If you’re questioning, getting vaccinated, maybe you reconsider especially with the kids going back to school.”

Reevey also says those who are of age in her family are now vaccinated.

Back in March, Alyssa was not eligible because she was only 15.

Reevey says her children have all dealt with this loss.

“Seeing them and the pain they’re going through and I’m having to be strong for them when I’m not strong myself,” Reevey said. “Today, I was like...no graduation, prom, wedding. I know I have other kids to share this with but with her being the oldest I feel like it’s been taken away from us.”

The CDC says you should contact your child’s doctor, nurse, or clinic right away if your child is showing symptoms of MIS-C.

Some of the signs are:

  • A fever and any of the following signs and symptoms:
  • Abdominal or gut pain
  • Bloodshot eyes
  • Chest tightness
  • Diarrhea
  • Feeling extra tired
  • Headaches
  • Low blood pressure
  • Neck pain
  • Rash
  • Vomiting

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