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Charlotte high school students do full-length virtual spring musical

Students did a virtual performance for their spring musical this year.
Students did a virtual performance for their spring musical this year.(Northwest School of the Arts)
Updated: May. 14, 2021 at 11:52 PM EDT
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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Virtual performances and programs may soon be coming to an end thanks to Governor Cooper’s eased restrictions - but students at one Charlotte high school said the show must go on even if it’s from behind a keyboard.

Schools with preapproved student performances, including dance, theater, orchestra, and band, will allow no more than one to two guests (parent/guardian) per participant, dependent upon school venue capacity, to attend performances following the safety protocols below:

  • For indoor events, each participant will be allowed to bring no more than one to two guests (parent/guardian) not to exceed 30 percent capacity of the venue. Face coverings will be required. Families/guest groups must physically distance and sit at least 6 feet apart from other families/guest groups.
  • A screening will be conducted prior to entry to the facility or performance event.
  • For outdoor events, each participant will be allowed to bring no more than one to two guests (parent/guardian). Face coverings are encouraged but will not be required at outdoor performances. Families/guest groups must physically distance and sit at least 6 feet apart from other families/guest groups.
  • Once the performance has been completed, families and guests will be required to exit campus immediately.

Students at Northwest School of the Arts said they wanted to find a way to do their spring musical with a larger audience but in a safe way.

The students’ virtual musical debuted Friday night.

Graduating senior Abigail Hamm said she feels performing arts students should still have the same chance to perform in front of a full audience the same way athletes can play in front of fans.

“Our audiences should not be seen as any less important than spectators at a basketball game,” Hamm said.

Hamm and her peers didn’t let the guidelines stop them. They fundraised over $2,500 to get the licensing and royalties to music for the show and spent months rehearsing.

Hamm is hoping performing arts students can get the chance to perform in front of a larger live audience again soon.

“The performers feed off the audience’s energy just as much as the audience feeds off the performer’s energy so just to be back doing what we love normally again, I think would just bring a lot of excitement and peace back to everyone’s lives,” Hamm said.

All proceeds will be donated to Theater Charlotte which was damaged in a fire last year.

At the time of this writing, CMS has not announced any new guidelines for student performances since the Governor’s announcement this afternoon.

To purchase tickets, visit https://tinyurl.com/workingtix.

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