Mecklenburg County reports more than 93K total coronavirus cases, 840+ virus-related deaths

Mecklenburg County reports more than 93K total coronavirus cases, 840+ virus-related deaths
Mecklenburg County officials are releasing more information about the coronavirus pandemic. (Source: WBTV)

MECKLENBURG COUNTY, N.C. (WBTV) - At least 843 Mecklenburg County residents have died due to COVID-19 and 93,750 have tested positive for the virus since the pandemic began.

During the week ending on Feb. 19, an average of 7.8 percent of individuals who were tested in Mecklenburg County were positive for COVID-19.

As of Feb. 17, coronavirus cases reported in the county include:

  • During the past week, an average of 345 laboratory confirmed infections per day were reported compared to the 14-day average of 384 confirmed infections. This represents a decrease over the last 14 days. These data are based on Mecklenburg resident cases reported to MCPH.
  • During the past week, an average of 241 individuals with laboratory confirmed COVID-19 infections were hospitalized at acute care facilities in Mecklenburg County.  This represents a decrease over the last 14 days. These data are based on daily census counts from acute care facilities in Mecklenburg County reporting to MCPH.
  • During the past week, an average of 7.8 percent of individuals who were tested in Mecklenburg County were positive for COVID-19.  This represents a decrease trend over the last 14 days. These data only include ELRs for molecular (PCR) tests submitted to NC DHHS for laboratories electronically submitting negative and positive COVID-19 results.
  • Eight hundred-thirty-eight deaths due to COVID-19 occurred among reported cases.
  • Almost all deaths were among older adults (≥ 60 years), 13 deaths occurred in adults ages 20 to 39 and 98 deaths were adults ages 40 to 59.
  • All deaths, except twenty-one, occurred among adults with underlying chronic illnesses.
  • Almost half were non-Hispanic Whites. The disparity in COVID-19 deaths among non-Hispanic Whites is related to differences in race/ethnicity of residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities actively experiencing an outbreak.
  • Nearly half of deaths were connected to active outbreaks at long-term care (LTC) facilities.
  • Among deaths not connected to outbreaks at long-term care facilities, nearly 3 in 4 were non-White, with 40 percent being non-Hispanic Black. As previously noted, these disparities are largely driven by higher rates of underlying chronic conditions that increase risk of severe complications due to COVID-19 infection among these communities
  • Based on publicly available mobility tracking data, social distancing represents a fairly stable trend in Mecklenburg County over the last 14 days.

Weeks earlier, Mecklenburg County reported that a child had died due to COVID-19 complications. This is the second child in North Carolina to die from virus-related complications.

Health leaders recently reported the first identification in a North Carolina resident of the COVID-19 variant B.1.1.7, which was first detected in the United Kingdom in December.

The B.1.1.7 variant was identified in a sample from an adult in Mecklenburg County processed by Mako Medical Laboratories. To protect the privacy of the individual, no further information will be released.

“That’s what these viruses do,” Harris said. “They mutate.”

During the past week, an average of 455 individuals with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infections were hospitalized at acute care facilities in Mecklenburg County

COVID-19 vaccination registration opened for those 65 years and older in Mecklenburg County.

Public Health Director Gibbie Harris acknowledged a decrease in coronavirus numbers across the state. “Just because our numbers are coming down does not mean we can take out foot off the gas,” Harris said.

To get detailed maps and graphics showing information concerning Mecklenburg County coronavirus cases, click here.

North Carolina moved into a modified “Safer at Home” order at 5 p.m. Friday, Dec. 11. These restrictions were to last until 5 p.m. on Jan. 8, but Gov. Roy Cooper extended the order until at least Jan. 22.

“This modified stay at home order aims to limit gatherings and get people home where they are safer, especially during the holidays,” Gov. Roy Cooper said. “It’s also a reminder that we must be vigilant the rest of the days -- wearing a mask, keeping a safe distance from people we don’t live with and washing our hands a lot.”

Cooper said the order will require people to stay at home between the hours of 10 p.m. to 5 a.m.

Most businesses will be required to close by 10 p.m. Cooper said onsite alcohol consumption sales must end at 9 p.m. Click here for more details on the order.

North Carolina moved into Phase 3 of reopening Friday, Oct. 2 at 5 p.m. Gov. Roy Cooper has announced twice since then that the state would remain paused in Phase 3.

Mecklenburg County Public Health Director Gibbie Harris says to watch out for contact tracing scams.

Harris said the county will call or text residents from a 980 or 704 number. They will ask you to confirm basic personal info, they will never ask for financial information or social security number.

Another scam reported involves a text that prompts the person to click a link and provide personal information.

The health director says testing guidance has not changed in the county.

They still have community spread so anyone who has been potentially exposed is recommended to be tested. Test results coming back within at least 48 to 72 hours.

Harris says school immunization guidelines have not changed, and that the health department is working with schools to make sure everyone is up to date by the end of October. Flu shots were also recommended before November.

People must wear face coverings when in public places, indoors or outdoors, where physical distancing of 6 feet from other people who aren’t in the same household isn’t possible.

The full executive order can be found here.

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