NOAA calls for an ‘extremely active’ 2020 Atlantic hurricane season

NOAA calls for an ‘extremely active’ 2020 Atlantic hurricane season
Thursday morning, NOAA released it's annual August update on the Atlantic hurricane season, calling for an "extremely active" hurricane season, which runs through November 30th. (Source: WBTV)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Thursday morning, NOAA released it's annual August update on the Atlantic hurricane season, calling for an "extremely active" hurricane season, which runs through November 30th.

2020 has already had a record setting Atlantic hurricane season, with nine named storms so far, and the potential to be one of the busiest on record.

An average hurricane season has 12 named storms, 6 hurricanes, and 3 major hurricanes.

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane forecast now calls for 19-25 named storms (winds 39 mph or greater), 7-11 hurricanes (74 mph or greater), and 3-6 major hurricanes (winds of 111 mph or greater).

In comparison, the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season had 19 named storms. The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season had a record setting 27 named storms, and had to use the Greek alphabet for naming storms. 2005 was also the year that Hurricane Katrina developed (a hurricane name that has since been retired).

The hurricane season officially runs from June 1st to November 30th, yet tropical systems can happen outside those dates. 2005′s last named storm was Tropical Storm Zeta, which developed December 30th, 2005 and lasted until January 6th, 2006. Tropical Storm Arthur developed this season on May 16th.

The active 2020 hurricane season is being attributed to: warmer than average sea surface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, reduced vertical wind shear, weaker tropical Atlantic trade winds, enhanced West African monsoon, and a possible La Nina development in the coming months.

Folks living along the East Coast and Gulf of Mexico coast are encouraged to be prepared, remain vigilant, and be ready to take action if necessary.

The WBTV First Alert Weather team will continue to closely monitor the tropics and keep you and your family safe.

WBTV Meteorologist Jason Myers

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