Local homeowners claim they’re not safe under their own roofs, because of roofer

Local homeowners claim they’re not safe under their own roofs, because of roofer

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (WBTV) - Jane Campbell Kiser needed to fix storm damage done to her roof, along with her deck and backdoors.

She hired Today’s Pro and David Grayson in Shelby, North Carolina.

But in a complaint she filed with the North Carolina Attorney General’s Office, Kiser included the inspection of a different roofer who found “significant issues with the work” including “no chimney flashing installed, allowing water to leak into the house” and the new metal roof was installed over the existing shingles allowing water to leak into the home.

“He just used the metal as a band aid,” Kiser said. “He put the metal over the damaged shingles and rotten wood.”

That’s even though the contract Kiser signed states shingles would be removed.

“He did what he wanted to do,” another customer Sherry Creech told WBTV.

Creech also hired Today’s Pro for several roofing jobs. In a complaint with the NCDOJ she says he ordered the metal roofs too short so there’s no overhang or protection for the home.

“I asked for three inch overhang, he says ‘well I have been in the business 25 years and I’m the roofer’,” Creech said.

In her complaint Terrie Ellis said the shingles Today’s Pro installed fell right off the house

“He had used a nail gun and shot the nails too deep into the shingles and into rotten wood,” Ellis said.

All of them say they were promised a 30 or 40-year warranty that wasn’t honored, but the actual written details in the contract do not include a warranty of that length. Ellis says she was never even given a contract and Kiser said she had to demand receipts from her payments.

WBTV spoke with Grayson’s attorney, Paul Ditz.

Ditz provided WBTV with a letter he sent to the Attorney General’s Office claiming the work was done correctly on Kiser’s home and that problems with leaks were because she wasn’t maintaining her home.

Ditz also said the roofer who inspected Kiser’s home afterward isn’t licensed. But because of North Carolina’s regulations for contractors most roofers in the state aren’t licensed.

WBTV asked Ditz if Grayson was licensed and Ditz said “I believe he is.”

But the North Carolina Licensing Board for General Contractors confirmed Grayson and Today’s Pro isn’t licensed.

In a letter to Kiser’s former attorney, Ditz also claimed that her home was inspected by a Cleveland County inspector. But WBTV pulled the permit records in Cleveland County, which would include any inspections. There were only two permits from Today’s Pro with any type of roofing work and neither were for Kiser’s home.

Grayson sent WBTV and email responding to some of the allegations from his customers and also answered several questions over the phone.

“We always follow what the costumer asks for and give choices as to what products will be used and installed. We hold license and have insurance in North and South Carolina,” Grayson wrote in an email.

Today’s Pro holds fuel/gas piping licenses in both states.

Over the phone, Grayson claimed the company also has a general contractors license in South Carolina and provided a license number.

But the South Carolina Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation confirmed Today’s Pro does not have a general contractor license.

Grayson also denied numerous other claims from his former customers about the effectiveness of his work, whether it us up to code and the quality of his products.

Ditz said they now plan to file a lawsuit against Kiser for making false allegations against Today’s Pro. The last thing Kiser wants right now is a lawsuit.

“My husband passed away a few years ago, I have two girls to look after,” Kiser said.

After spending more than $20,000 on this project she’s not sure where the money to fix it is going to come from.

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