Mysterious hairy 'globster' washes up on a beach. It's being cal - | WBTV Charlotte

Mysterious hairy 'globster' washes up on a beach. It's being called an omen of doom.

The "globster" is foul smelling, but that's not stopping people from going to the site for selfies, reports the Daily Mirror (Credit: Twitter screenshot) The "globster" is foul smelling, but that's not stopping people from going to the site for selfies, reports the Daily Mirror (Credit: Twitter screenshot)
CHARLOTTE, NC (Mark Price/The Charlotte Observer) -

A giant, foul smelling "globster sea creature" has washed up in the Philippines, leading frightened villagers to vow it is a sign of doom, reported news outlets such as the British tabloid, the Sun.

The big, hairy carcass showed up May 11 on a beach near the town of San Antonio in the Oriental Mindoro province, according to multiple media outlets.

Early coverage has appeared in the same types of media outlets that cover ghost and alien abductions. However, National Geographic acknowledged some similar mysterious "hairy blob" discoveries last year, suggesting the find isn't a hoax.

The Sunday Express summed up a less scientific perspective Saturday under the headline: “BAD OMEN as 20ft SEA MONSTER sparks fears of imminent DISASTER in Philippines.”

Locals are “terrified the strange sea creature is a harbinger of impending doom,” said the site.

Photos posted on Twitter show the “creature” resembles an extremely dirty shag carpet.

Frightened villagers told the Daily Mail and other media outlets that the "unidentified floating object" means an earthquake or some other disaster is soon to follow.

“It has been told that when creatures from the deepest parts of the ocean start appearing, something bad will happen," Vincent Pena Badillo told the Sunday Express.

The BBC reports other “globsters” have washed up ashore in the region in recent years, leading some to speculate it’s a new, yet to be discovered species.

National Geographic reported on a similar find last year involving 49-foot-long carcass that turned up on the Indonesian Island of Seram. And yes, there was a possible link to major earthquakes, though the sequence was off a bit, said National Geographic.

“A number of these hairy carcasses have washed ashore, likely surfaced by storm surges caused by the shaking,” reported National Geographic.

Lucy Babey, of the cetacean conservation charity ORCA, told the BBC last year she believessuch finds are a “sea creature in the later stages of decomposition."

In 2017, scientists identified one such glob in Indonesia as a Baleen whale, reported Global News.

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