Rae Carruth's son and son's grandmother plan to be at gates for - | WBTV Charlotte

Rae Carruth's son and son's grandmother plan to be at gates for release

Rae Carruth, a former member of the Carolina Panthers, looks away as Michael Eugene Kennedy points out Carruth to the jury during testimony Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2000, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Jeff Siner, Pool) Rae Carruth, a former member of the Carolina Panthers, looks away as Michael Eugene Kennedy points out Carruth to the jury during testimony Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2000, in Charlotte, N.C. (AP Photo/Jeff Siner, Pool)
Saundra Adams, center, gestures as she speaks to the media as her ex-husband Jeff Moonie, left, watches. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton) Saundra Adams, center, gestures as she speaks to the media as her ex-husband Jeff Moonie, left, watches. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) -

During his formative years and through a well-documented journey as an adolescent, Chancellor Lee Adams evolved as a person who has beaten many odds.

Dealt an unfair hand at birth, Chancellor survived a fatal shooting orchestrated by his father, former Carolina Panther Rae Carruth. That homicide ended the life of his mother Cherica Adams, Saundra's 24-year-old daughter, who was carrying him at the time.

He continues to deal with a number of health challenges and remains in therapy as a result of that violence in 1999.

Always close by is his supportive grandmother, Saundra Adams.

"Chancellor is strong, is happy, is loved," she said. "He's a fighter. He's determined. He's a mighty warrior."

Carruth was found guilty on conspiracy charges. 

These days, Chancellor's grandmother and guardian is on a new self-imposed mission.

"I want Chancellor to get to see his father," she said.

Based on records from the North Carolina Department of Corrections, that could happen next year. Carruth's published release date is October 22, 2018.

"I want him to have that eye-to-eye contact with him," Adams said.

Chancellor's 18th birthday is in November. In his young life, he's developed an appreciation for horseback riding. Adams attributes his skills to the father he has never known.

"He's got those football hands," she said. "I thank Rae Carruth because without him my grandson would not be who he is."

Their message of grace and forgiveness was recently shared with inmates at the Mecklenburg County Jail. For Adams, turning the other cheek is a needed exercise in moving forward.

"I needed that for me to be able to grow healthily," she explained.

When Carruth was sent away, he may not have known another day of reckoning would come. But his son and Adams plan to be at the prison gates at the time of his release.

Adams gave a simple reason for wanting to be there.

"I want him to see what a fine young man his son has grown up to be."?

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