Trump says he'll be 'angry' if Senate health care bill flops - | WBTV Charlotte

Trump says he'll be 'angry' if Senate health care bill flops

(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., with his director of operations Stefanie Hagar Muchow, right, walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., with his director of operations Stefanie Hagar Muchow, right, walks to his office on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 11, 2017.
(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File). In this June 30, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File). In this June 30, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington.
  • More InformationMore>>

  • Senate consumer choice idea could raise premiums for sick

    Senate consumer choice idea could raise premiums for sick

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 2:19 AM EDT2017-07-12 06:19:28 GMT
    Thursday, July 13 2017 3:16 PM EDT2017-07-13 19:16:53 GMT
    A proposal from Senate conservatives that would let health insurers sell skimpy policies provided they also offer a comprehensive plan is being billed as pro-consumer, allowing freedom of choice and potential savings.More >>
    A proposal from Senate conservatives that would let health insurers sell skimpy policies provided they also offer a comprehensive plan is being billed as pro-consumer, allowing freedom of choice and potential savings.More >>
  • FBI nominee rejects Trump claim: Russia probe no witch hunt

    FBI nominee rejects Trump claim: Russia probe no witch hunt

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 3:30 AM EDT2017-07-12 07:30:44 GMT
    Thursday, July 13 2017 5:51 AM EDT2017-07-13 09:51:52 GMT

    Announced as the nominee in a curt, early morning tweet by Trump, and without the pageantry of a Rose Garden ceremony, the hearing will offer the first public, close-up look at Christopher Wray's background.

    More >>

    Announced as the nominee in a curt, early morning tweet by Trump, and without the pageantry of a Rose Garden ceremony, the hearing will offer the first public, close-up look at Christopher Wray's background.

    More >>
  • Lawmakers intend to question Trump campaign chairman

    Lawmakers intend to question Trump campaign chairman

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 2:50 AM EDT2017-07-12 06:50:39 GMT
    Thursday, July 13 2017 3:14 AM EDT2017-07-13 07:14:31 GMT

    Disclosing a series of emails, President Donald Trump's eldest son revealed he was eager to hear damaging information about Hillary Clinton from the Russian government.

    More >>

    Disclosing a series of emails, President Donald Trump's eldest son revealed he was eager to hear damaging information about Hillary Clinton from the Russian government.

    More >>
  • In Paris, Trump is Bastille Day guest of city he derided

    In Paris, Trump is Bastille Day guest of city he derided

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 1:48 AM EDT2017-07-12 05:48:34 GMT
    Thursday, July 13 2017 3:02 AM EDT2017-07-13 07:02:06 GMT

    The overseas trip comes as Trump is dogged by fresh controversy over his campaign's potential connections to Russia.

    More >>

    The overseas trip comes as Trump is dogged by fresh controversy over his campaign's potential connections to Russia.

    More >>
  • Congressional GOP shrugs off latest Trump-Russia twist

    Congressional GOP shrugs off latest Trump-Russia twist

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 2:20 AM EDT2017-07-12 06:20:04 GMT
    Wednesday, July 12 2017 5:32 PM EDT2017-07-12 21:32:59 GMT

    Congressional Republicans are largely shrugging off the latest twist in the investigation involving Russia and President Donald Trump, deferring to ongoing investigations when asked about new email revelations from the president's son.

    More >>

    Congressional Republicans are largely shrugging off the latest twist in the investigation involving Russia and President Donald Trump, deferring to ongoing investigations when asked about new email revelations from the president's son.

    More >>
  • As Russia scandal touches his son, Trump privately rages

    As Russia scandal touches his son, Trump privately rages

    Wednesday, July 12 2017 2:40 AM EDT2017-07-12 06:40:28 GMT
    Wednesday, July 12 2017 5:03 PM EDT2017-07-12 21:03:32 GMT
    The snowballing revelations about Donald Trump Jr.'s meeting with a Russian lawyer during last year's presidential campaign have broadsided the White House, distracting from its agenda as aides grapple with a...More >>
    The snowballing revelations about Donald Trump Jr.'s meeting with a Russian lawyer during last year's presidential campaign have broadsided the White House, distracting from its agenda as aides grapple with a crisis involving the president's family.More >>
By ALAN FRAM
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Donald Trump said Wednesday he will be "very angry" if the Senate fails to pass a revamped Republican health care bill and said Majority Leader Mitch McConnell must "pull it off," intensifying pressure on party leaders laboring to win over unhappy GOP senators and preserve the teetering measure.

Trump's remarks came a day before McConnell, R-Ky., planned to release his revised legislation to a closed-door meeting of GOP senators. The new legislation would keep most of the initial Medicaid cuts and makes other changes aimed at nailing down support, but internal GOP disputes lingered that were threatening to sink it.

With all Democrats set to vote no, McConnell was moving toward a do-or-die roll call next week on beginning debate, a motion that will require backing from 50 of the 52 GOP senators.

Conservative Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., said Wednesday he would oppose the motion and moderate Republican Susan Collins of Maine seemed all but sure to do the same - leaving McConnell with zero margin for error to sustain his party's goal of toppling President Barack Obama's health care law. Several other GOP senators were holdouts as well, leaving McConnell and his lieutenants just days to win them over or face a major defeat.

In a White House interview conducted Wednesday for the Christian Broadcasting Network's "The 700 Club," Trump said it was time for action by congressional Republicans who cast scores of votes "that didn't mean anything" to repeal the 2010 law while Obama was still president.

"Well, I don't even want to talk about it because I think it would be very bad," he said when network founder Pat Robertson asked what would happen if the effort fails. "I will be very angry about it and a lot of people will be very upset."

Asked if McConnell would succeed, Trump said, "Mitch has to pull it off."

Trump has played a limited role in cajoling GOP senators to back the legislation. Asked Wednesday about the president's involvement, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters the White House was providing "technical assistance."

McConnell's new bill was expected to offer only modest departures from the original version.

Its key elements remain easing Obama's requirements that insurers cover specified services like hospital care and cutting the Medicaid health care program for the poor, disabled and nursing home patients. Obama's penalties on people who don't buy coverage would be eliminated and federal health care subsidies would be less generous.

The new package would eliminate tax increases the statute imposed on the health care industry. But it would retain Obama tax boosts on upper-income people, and use the revenue to help some lower earners afford coverage, provide $45 billion to help states combat drug abuse and give extra money to some hospitals in states that didn't use Obama's law to expand Medicaid.

Paul told reporters the revised measure didn't go far enough.

"I don't see anything in here really remotely resembling repeal," he said.

Collins has long complained the measure will toss millions off coverage. Spokeswoman Annie Clarke said Collins would vote no next week "if the Medicaid cuts remain the same" as those that have been discussed.

Besides Paul and Collins, at least three other Republican senators publicly said they hadn't decided whether to back McConnell on the initial vote: conservative Sens. Ted Cruz of Texas, Utah's Mike Lee and Tim Scott of South Carolina.

Cruz and Lee are chief authors of a proposal backed by other conservatives that would let an insurer sell low-premium, bare-bones policies as long as the company also sold a plan covering all the services - like substance abuse treatment - required by Obama's law.

Their plan has alienated moderates worried it will mean unaffordable coverage for people with serious medical conditions because healthier people would flock to cheaper, skimpier plans. Party leaders have not determined if the proposal will be in their measure, and there have been talks about altering it to limit premium boosts on full-coverage policies.

"If there are not meaningful protections for consumer freedom that will significantly lower premiums then the bill will not have the votes to go forward," Cruz told reporters.

Lee has said he wants their proposal in the bill, or something else relaxing Obama's coverage requirements, for him to support it.

Their proposal endured another blow when the insurance industry's largest trade group, America's Health Insurance Plans, said it would lead to "unstable health insurance markets" and said people with serious pre-existing medical conditions could "lose access" to comprehensive or reasonably priced coverage.

Scott said he was still trying to determine if the legislation would help families and consumers with pre-existing medical problems.

Sen. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, who has fought to ease the bill's Medicaid reductions, has also yet to commit to back the measure next week.

McConnell withdrew an initial package two weeks ago in the face of Republican discord that would have spelled certain defeat.

___

AP reporters Erica Werner, Jill Colvin, Matthew Daly and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar contributed to this report.

Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Powered by Frankly