Bankruptcy trustee seeks to recover $421,000 in pay from former - | WBTV Charlotte

Bankruptcy trustee seeks to recover $421,000 in pay from former Mayor Foxx

Former Charlotte mayor and current United States Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx smiles as he and (right) Charlotte mayor Dan Clodfelter talk during a ceremony recognizing Charlotte's first streetcar in 77 years. (Jeff Siner |The Charlotte Observer) Former Charlotte mayor and current United States Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx smiles as he and (right) Charlotte mayor Dan Clodfelter talk during a ceremony recognizing Charlotte's first streetcar in 77 years. (Jeff Siner |The Charlotte Observer)
CHARLOTTE, NC (Ely Portillo/The Charlotte Observer) -

A trustee overseeing the liquidation of a bankrupt Charlotte bus firm is seeking to recover almost $421,000 in pay from former Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, which the trustee says the mayor received for doing little to no work.

Foxx now serves in President Obama’s cabinet as U.S. Secretary of Transportation. He was appointed to the post in 2013. Before becoming a cabinet secretary, Foxx spent four years at DesignLine as deputy general counsel.

DesignLine, which made hybrid electric buses, struggled financially and filed for bankruptcy protection in 2013.

The company paid Foxx almost $421,000 during his time at DesignLine, according to a filing in federal bankruptcy court last week by Elaine Rudisill, the trustee overseeing the company’s liquidation. The filing alleges Foxx didn’t actually do the job he reportedly had at DesignLine.

“Defendant spent little to no time at the Debtors’ facilities during the relevant time period,” the trustee wrote. DesignLine also employed two outside law firms, paying them millions of dollars. In her filing, Rudisill said there is no evidence Foxx communicated with them at all.

“The Debtors’ books and records do not reflect any communications between Defendant and the Outside Firms, nor do they reflect any activities or actions of Defendant in his role as Deputy General Counsel,” Rudisill said.

Rudisill declined to comment. Foxx couldn’t be reached immediately Tuesday.

A schedule of regular payments to Foxx show he was paid $3,580.77 every two weeks for much of the time he was employed, as well as overtime payments of nearly the same amount.

OBSERVER RESEARCHER MARIA DAVID AND STAFF WRITERS RICK ROTHACKER AND STEVE HARRISON CONTRIBUTED

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