School Resource Officers missing at some CMS schools - | WBTV Charlotte

School Resource Officers missing at some CMS schools

CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) -

Two Charlotte Mecklenburg schools that had School Resource Officers (SRO's) last year will not have them this year. Those officers will be transferred to schools that are more troubled.

Charlotte Mecklenburg school (CMS) district says reassigning the School Resource Officers is not about money but rather reshuffling its resources.

"There maybe some schools in our district that may not have a SRO," CMS Communications Executive Director Renee McCoy said. "But there will be some level of security at that particular school. What we are doing is meeting the needs of a particular school. It is an ongoing process."

SRO's are Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Officers. They carry guns and can arrest. They are stationed at every middle and high school. Campus Security Associates (CSA's) will replace the SRO's at the two schools with no SRO's. CSA's don't carry a gun and cannot arrest. Parents think the district should be fair when keeping students safe.

"There should be no school left behind," CMS Parent Adrena Taylor said. "Like No child left behind, No school left behind. If you are going to do it for one, everybody should have it."

CMPD has 49 SRO's. They will be stationed at all but two schools the first day of class.

"It supposed to be a safe place for kids," Taylor said. "We need to make it as safe as possible."

CMS officials say the schools will be safe and that is why parents will not be alerted about the change.

"There is no plan to message parents to that degree," McCoy said. "At this point because the level of security will be at a level where we feel is safe, so there is no reason for parents to be concerned."

CMS says this is an ongoing situation and staffing could change. Class starts August 25th.

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