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Mia's move: family moving to Colorado to get marijuana for daughter

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"That's the goal, to have a healthy Mia," Mia's father Dylan said. (Source: The Morley Family) "That's the goal, to have a healthy Mia," Mia's father Dylan said. (Source: The Morley Family)
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  • Moving for Marijuana: Mia's story

    Moving for Marijuana: Mia's story

    Friday, February 28 2014 8:30 AM EST2014-02-28 13:30:32 GMT
    WILMINGTON, NC (WECT)- If your child had a rare disease and the only possible cure was illegal in your state, would you move across the country where it's legal? Dylan and Kelly Morley of Wilmington areMore >>
    A Wilmington family is moving to Colorado to get medical marijuana for their six-year-old daughter.More >>

WILMINGTON, NC (WECT) - When the moving truck backed into the driveway of their home, Dylan and Kelly Morley realized it was real. The Wilmington family is moving from North Carolina to Colorado so their 6-year-old daughter Mia can get marijuana to treat a rare form of epilepsy.

"It's very emotional," Dylan said. "Even as I just drive my car around town and I'm by myself for a minute, it kind of sinks in--all the family and friends that we're leaving."

The Morley's made the decision to move to Colorado, where marijuana is legal, after Dylan went out to visit the facility where the marijuana is grown and processed. It's not the kind you smoke, rather an oil extracted from the marijuana plants.

Four siblings, the Stanley brothers, developed the strain called Charlotte's Web. It's named after the first recipient and has significantly reduced seizures in children with epilepsy.

"We've gotten to the point with Mia where we don't really have a choice," Dylan said. "She started going downhill to the point that we needed to make the move immediately."

Mia, who has not been able to walk or talk since birth, has two to three seizures every minute. Conventional treatments simply don't work.

The treatment in Colorado has about an 85% success rate in children with epilepsy similar to Mia's, but the Morleys know it's not guaranteed to work for their child.

"We've been let down time, after time, after time, with all of her conventional medications," Kelly says. "We are no stranger to heartbreak and things not working, but of all the things that we've tried, we feel like this has the strongest likelihood of working."

Dylan recently resigned from his position at the Toyota dealership in Wilmington where he was the finance director. He doesn't have a new job in Denver yet, but hopes that will come in time.

Dylan will drive the moving truck to Colorado. Kelly will fly out the first of April with Mia and the Morley's other two children.

Mia should start treatments soon after they arrive, but it could be a few weeks, perhaps even a few months before the Morley's see a reduction in her seizures. But they are determined to give her the best shot.

"That's the goal, to have a healthy Mia," Dylan said.

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