Report debunks racial stereotypes about fathers - | WBTV Charlotte

Report debunks racial stereotypes about fathers

CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) -

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a newly released study debunks racial stereotypes about African American fathers.

Over a 5 year period, the CDC asked more than 22,000 men and women to complete a survey about their families.

The focus of the survey: How involved is dad?

In the National Survey of Family Growth, families were asked how often the father feeds or eats with his children. 78% of African American families said everyday -- higher than both Caucasian and Hispanic families.

When asked about bathing or diapering children, 70% of African American families answered that the father does this activity every day.

According to the CDC, 82% of African American families also said the father of the house plays with his kids every day.

Why is this important? Clay Parker, who runs the 'Right Start: Parent for Life' program for Fathers in Mecklenburg County, said the numbers cast a more positive light on African American men.

"The numbers paint a much different picture than how African American men are typically portrayed on TV and in Movies," Parker said. "This study goes against the 'absent African American father' stereotype. The truth is there are a lot of African American fathers who are actively involved in their children's lives."

 Parker tells WBTV he hopes the study will start the process of making the 'absent African American father' stereotype an ideology of the past.

 "A lot of times when you hear about African American fathers you hear the word crisis. However, African American dads are stepping up to the plate. They are there for their children."

The National Survey of Family Growth focused on fathers between the ages of 15 and 44. The data was collected between 2006 and 2010.

Copyright 2014 WBTV. All rights reserved.

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