Little Sisters of the Poor leaving Evansville - | WBTV Charlotte

Little Sisters of the Poor leaving Evansville

The Little Sisters of the Poor are leaving Evansville after 131 years of service.

They have been serving the elderly every since they arrived in Evansville in 1882.

On Sunday, the Evansville community decided to serve them a mass of Thanksgiving, thanking them for their work.

The Sisters of the Poor are aging and they are not getting many new members so they are being forced to close some doors.

St. John's home for the Aged was sold and the sisters are moving into new homes.

"When a family member leaves home on a new job or a transfer or a child gets married and goes away, they're still your family and we're still family and the people of Evansville and the Tri-State are still our family," said Carolyn Martin.

The sisters described Sunday as bittersweet.

They said everyone now has a new mission.

Although they are sad to leave, they are excited for what's to come.

Copyright 2013 WFIE. All rights reserved.

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