Flooding causes major problems in Hampton County - | WBTV Charlotte

Flooding causes major problems in Hampton County

HAMPTON CO., SC (WTOC) -

Hampton County has received more than 22 inches of rain since June 10, and it's causing major problems.

According to Emergency management officials, more than 17 roads are closed, most of them in the Brunson section of the county.

"In Brunson alone, they've had more than 16 inches of rain there," said Susanne Peeples, Hampton County Emergency Management Director.

Turpentine Still Road, Hogarth Road, Croaker Swamp Road, Bert Terry Road and a portion of Deep River Drive off Luray Highway are all closed in Brunson.

And in other parts of the county, Trowell Road, Society Street, Camp Cornbread Road, and Black Swamp Road are all closed.

Peeples says the county hasn't seen rain like this since 1996.

"It can be really dangerous," said Peeples. "It reminds me of some of the floods like out in Tennessee where it just takes the car and goes through the water. All you have to do is slip up in some of these canals, they're at least 11 to 12 inches deep."

Hampton County officials are asking folks to contact them if they come across deep puddles. They're expecting more rain, and say things will get worse as the week goes on.

Copyright 2013 WTOC. All rights reserved.

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