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Flea market finds: Lionel toy trains

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Flea markets are a treasure trove of nostalgic finds, and some all-time favorites are old toy trains.

Everywhere in the world you have people who collect trains, and most of the time they talk about one brand in particular: Lionel.

Leeza Gibbons traveled down to a popular flea market and spoke with antique collector, George Lawson. George says one of his trains was manufactured after World War II. He's asking $150 dollars for it.

"We have a love affair with trains," says Gibbons. "It's not just little boys and kids, but people love trains."

Lawson agrees but adds, "Even young girls like trains."

"Of course! And we love to collect them. It's romantic. There's something magical about it," adds Gibbons.

If you find an old toy locomotive at a flea market, Lawson says one way to tell it's a Lionel is by the name plate on the bottom.

"It was made in America," says George.

But what many people don't know is in 1942, Lionel temporarily stopped toy train production and started manufacturing compasses for the war.

Lawson points out a certain compass, "That's a Pelorus that went on a ship for the Navy. And it's probably worth about $350."

Lawson says you can't go wrong with a classic Lionel train. And if you happen to come across an old Lionel Pelorus compass, grab it! Its value is only going in one direction: Up!

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