Teacher charged with assaulting student resigns his position - | WBTV Charlotte

Teacher charged with assaulting student resigns his position

Daniel Johns, 35. (Photo courtesy: Rock Hill Police Department) Daniel Johns, 35. (Photo courtesy: Rock Hill Police Department)
ROCK HILL, SC (WBTV) -

A Rock Hill school teacher has resigned his position after police say he assaulted a student.

Daniel Johns, the school teacher at Rosewood Elementary charged with assault and battery 3rd offense after a student told police Johns grabbed her arm so hard it caused a bruise, has resigned from his position, according to the Rock Hill School District.

His resignation was approved by the school board on April 22nd.

Johns applied for a  Pretrial Intervention Program in court earlier this month.

According to a Rock Hill police report, officers were called to Rosewood Elementary at 12:15 p.m. on Wednesday, March 27th.

That's when officers learned that between 7:30 a.m. and 7:40 a.m. Johns reportedly assaulted a 9-year-old girl.

Police officials told WBTV that Johns grabbed the little girl by the arm, because she wasn't listening, and left a "pretty obvious bruise" on the upper left arm of the girl. She did not require immediate medical attention.

Johns has been a teacher in Rock Hill Schools, and at Rosewood Elementary, since August 2002.

Copyright 2013 WBTV. All rights reserved.

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