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FOX19 Investigates: Claims surrounding possible nursing home closure

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An exasperated Jack Crout, owner of Meadowwood, says he doesn’t understand why the state is coming down so hard on him. An exasperated Jack Crout, owner of Meadowwood, says he doesn’t understand why the state is coming down so hard on him.
Ombdusman Beverly Laubert is trying to find residents other places to live. Ombdusman Beverly Laubert is trying to find residents other places to live.
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  • 60 seniors displaced after nursing home violations

    60 seniors displaced after nursing home violations

    Monday, February 4 2013 6:57 PM EST2013-02-04 23:57:16 GMT
    Dozens of seniors have been displaced after a Georgetown nursing home is forced to close its doors. The MeadowWood Care Center owners say they are forced to shut down because of two violations at the facility,More >>
    The MeadowWood Care Center owners say they are forced to shut down because of two violations at the facility, a leak in the roof and bad carpeting. As a result, 60 residents were displaced and over 80 employees will lose their jobs. More >>
GEORGETOWN, OH (FOX19) -

Meadowwood Care Center owner Jack Crout claims the state is unnecessarily putting residents of his nursing home in danger by forcing him to shut down. The Ohio Department of Health, meanwhile, argues Crout has had six months to correct violations, but is still not in compliance, so the agency is blocking his Medicare and Medicaid funding.

FOX19 obtained inspection records for Meadowwood showing major violations last summer: A resident with a mental disability was gone from the nursing home for two hours after slipping out a door that had been left unlocked; a state investigator found evidence that mice had eaten food in the nursing home's kitchen, along with mouse droppings, and two live mice stuck to a glue mousetrap.

Crout says those issues have been resolved.

The state says the facility has a mold problem, which Crout denies. He does concede his nursing home still has water damage and frayed, stained carpeting. However, he argues that should not rise to the level of blocking his funding. He also accuses the state watchdogs of putting residents in danger by saying that statistically 18% of the residents who leave will die because of the disruption. It's a statistic he says he got from his attorney.


FOX19 could not confirm that statistic in our research. However, we did find a study that suggests the death rate for nursing home patients with severe dementia skyrockets after an evacuation.

Factually speaking, the state is not forcing the residents to leave nor is it forcing Crout to close down Meadowwood. But it is blocking his Medicare and Medicaid funding, which Crout says will have the same effect. He says only about five residents self-pay. That means all of the others are dependent on Medicare and Medicaid to pay their bills. So Crout argues blocking that funding has the effect of shutting down the facility.

A health department spokeswoman says the funding will continue for 30 more days and that the state is working with residents and their families to find other acceptable places to go.

In fact, when FOX19 visited on Monday, a state long-term care ombudsman was there offering families assistance.

"Some people, we've already heard, will be returning to the community to live with family," said ombudsman Beverly Laubert with the Ohio Department of Aging. "Some people are choosing other nursing homes. Someone might be going to a group home. So lots of options (are) available for people and we just want to help them."

Crout still hopes to find a way for residents to be able to stay. He's negotiating with two people who are part of a partnership. They've expressed interest in buying or leasing the nursing home. He's hoping to come to an understanding with them quickly because he expects the first residents may start leaving Friday.

Meanwhile, health department spokeswoman Tessie Pollock says she understands why many residents are sad to leave since many have gotten, in her words, "great care." But she also notes that a January inspection, which the department calls an annual survey, had to be aborted because the "administration of Meadowwood was being uncooperative and impeding the survey."

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