Organization goes to new heights to push for clean energy - | WBTV Charlotte

Organization goes to new heights to push for clean energy

An environmental group is going to new heights in Charlotte in an effort to convince Duke Energy to use what it calls cleaner and cheaper energy.

On Thursday morning, a Greenpeace airship flight over Charlotte called on Duke Energy to transition from burning coal toward a clean energy future with banners reading "Duke: Don't Raise Rates for Dirty Energy" and "Cleaner is Cheaper."

The flight comes six months after six North Carolina activists were arrested for hanging a banner in front of the Duke Energy headquarters in Charlotte that read "No Dirty Rate Hikes."

The flight was part of a statewide tour by Greenpeace.

"It's time for Duke Energy to be a leader, which means investing in real solutions in the Carolinas like wind, solar and energy efficiency," said Charlottean Beth Henry. "I don't want my money paying for Duke's coal pollution."

Henry was joined by a group of local activists, laying out letters on the grass in Veterans Park that read: "We want affordable rates & clean air. Be a leader Duke."

"Duke Energy has made it clear that they will continue to raise rates here in Charlotte and across the state in order to keep dirty coal plants, like the four that surround our city, on life support," said Monica Embrey, North Carolina Organizer for Greenpeace and one of the activists arrested in front of the Duke headquarters. "Instead, Duke can and should invest in renewable energy, which Greenpeace has shown can save ratepayers $108 billion over 20 years."

Along with the airship tour, last week Greenpeace released "Charting the Correction Course: A Clean Energy Pathway for Duke Energy."

Greenpeace says the report demonstrates how Duke Energy can invest in wind, solar and energy efficiency while saving themselves and North Carolina rate payers over $100 billion in twenty years.
   
"Investing in renewable energy is a win, win," said Mike Johnson, report author and senior analyst for Greenpeace. "Duke and their ratepayers can save money while investing in the long term growth of the region and significantly reducing pollution all at the same time."

PHOTOS: Greenpeace flies above Charlotte

PHOTOS: Greenpeace flies above Charlotte More>>

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