Now banned interrogation techniques lead to bin Laden's capture - | WBTV Charlotte

Now banned interrogation techniques lead to bin Laden's capture

George Bush (left) and President Obama meet in the Oval Office shortly before Obama was sworn in. (Source: Whitehouse.gov) George Bush (left) and President Obama meet in the Oval Office shortly before Obama was sworn in. (Source: Whitehouse.gov)
A drawing of the compound from the US Defense Dept. A drawing of the compound from the US Defense Dept.

WASHINGTON (AP) - Officials say CIA interrogators in secret overseas prisons developed the first strands of information that ultimately led to the killing of Osama bin Laden.

Meanwhile, details are coming out about just what happened during the raid to nab Bin Laden -- who was code named "Jackpot" in the operation.

Current and former U.S. officials say that Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, provided the nom de guerre of one of bin Laden's most trusted aides.

Full Coverage: The raid on Osama bin Laden

The CIA got similar information Mohammed's successor, Abu Faraj al-Libi. Both were subjected to harsh interrogation tactics inside CIA prisons in Poland and Romania.

The news is sure to reignite debate over whether the now-closed interrogation and detention program was successful.

In the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks, former president George W. Bush authorized the CIA to use the harshest interrogation tactics in U.S. history. President Barack Obama closed the prison system.

And now, CIA Director Leon Panetta is offering further details, in interviews with Time and the PBS "Newshour."

Related story: Secret SEAL team from bin Laden raid is based in Virginia

He tells PBS that once the teams went in, "almost 20 or 25 minutes" went by in which officials in Washington "really didn't know just exactly what was going on."

In the Time interview, Panetta says that when the head of Joint Special Forces Command reported that commandos had identified "Geronimo" -- the code name for the operation -- then "all the air we were holding came out."

Bin Laden's code name during the operation was known as "Jackpot," some news sites reported.

And he says when the helicopters left the compound 15 minutes later, the room broke into applause.

Meanwhile, congress may consider docking the almost $1.3 billion dollars in annual aid to Pakistan if it turns out the Islamabad government knew where Osama bin Laden was hiding, the head of the Senate Intelligence committee said Tuesday.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said she wants more details from CIA director Leon Panetta and others about the Pakistani government's role. Feinstein spoke to reporters about the raid that killed bin Laden early Monday and the questions raised by his hiding place deep inside Pakistan.

Incredulous lawmakers are pressing Pakistan for answers to two simple questions: What did its army and intelligence agents know of bin Laden's whereabouts and when did they know it?

Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved

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