Closed Captioning Contacts - | WBTV Charlotte

Closed Captioning Contacts

If you have issues or questions about the WBTV closed-captioning system, here are the folks to contact:

For immediate concerns, please contact:

Mike Gurthie - Director of Engineering
mgurthie@wbtv.com
Telephone: 704-374-3610
Fax: 334-956-0821

Shelly Hill - Director of Programming
shill@wbtv.com
Telephone: 704-374-3973
Fax: 334-956-0842

For written concerns, please contact:

Mike Gurthie - Director of Engineering
1 Julian Price Place
Charlotte, NC 28208
mgurthie@wbtv.com
Fax: 334-956-0821

Scott Dempsey - General Manager
1 Julian Price Place
Charlotte, NC 28208
sdempsey@wbtv.com
Fax: 334-956-0807

NOTE: If you have at TTY system and need to use that to contact us, please call 704-374-3681

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